Taking My Leave of Number 13?

Walked early to look at my old house in Piccadilly - saw into the room where I have sat with him, and felt as if I had lived there with a friend who was long since dead to me. No sense of past agony - all mournfully soft. My thoughts floated peacefully into other channels …

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A Melancholy, ‘Honeft Man’…

I must see my agent to-night. I wonder when that Newstead business will be finished. It cost me more than words to part with it - and to have parted with it! What matters it what I do? or what becomes of me? - but let me remember Job's saying, and console myself with being a "living …

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The Ghost of Piccadilly…

Of All Romances in Miniature… Perhaps this is the Best Shape in which Romance can Appear. Lord Byron As an artist AND a passionate devotee of Regency History who loves to create a scene and not only of the hysterical kind; it is perhaps only to be expected that I would create a Regency inspired …

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Adieu Most Amiable Mamma…

 I thought my dear Augusta that your opinion of my meek mamma would coincide with mine... But she flies into a fit of phrenzy, upbraids me as if I was the most undutiful wretch in existence, rakes up the ashes of my father, abuses him, says I shall be a true Byrrone, which is the worst …

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Let Me Have the Implora Pace!

The last sad rites to the illustrious dead were performed upon the remains of this great poet at four o'clock on Friday evening last, in the family vault of the church of Hucknall Torkard, in this county, close to the ancient demesne of the Byons, who held Newstead Abbey for centuries... On this day, July …

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It’s Daggers at Dawn!

My dear Ly. M - God knows what has happened - but a 4 in the morning Ly. Ossulstone angry (& at that moment ugly) delivered to me a confused kind of message from you of some scene - this is all I know - except that with laudable logic she drew the usual feminine …

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Stone Me! Such a Pretentious Poseur!

John Cam Hobhouse inspired by his love of classical antiquity had commissioned the fashionable Danish sculptor Bertel Thorvaldsen to make a portrait bust of his 'dearest friend' during their visit to Rome in May 1817. One wonders if he had to try hard to persuade his 'dearest friend' to actually sit for Thorvaldsen as the first meeting between the artist and Byron was one of wry amusement on the part of one and studied indifference by the other...

Far from the Scenes of Birth and Youth…

That eye which had gleam'd as in flashed from Heav'n, - Whose glances by angles and demons seem'd given. - It anxiously gaz'd, but its language and lights As they faded were seal'd from mortality's sights. In the days following the news of Lord Byron's death in Greece on April 19 1824; his young widow …

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Thursday’s Angel Child HAS Far to Go!

As I began my previous tale with an epistolary rant from the Hon. Judith Noel as she championed the separation of her ‘poor Child’ from the ‘unmanly and despicable’ Ld B; the drama of which continues to reverberate and divide opinion some 200 years later; it is with a hint of mischief that I hand over the baton …

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Blest Her! The Angel Suffers No More…

Your barbarous and hard hearted Brother has I am too firmly persuaded broken the heart that was devoted to him - and I doubt not will have pleasure in the Deed. She will not long exist, so he may glory in the Success of his endeavors. She is dreadfully ill and was last night and this day …

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MAY You Marry in Haste?

"Mr Farquar of Doctor’s Commons has a copy of the certificate of my marriage which he got from Bath…..I was married however on the 12th or 13th May (I don’t know which..." It is interesting that Byron’s mother should have been unsure as to the precise date of her fated marriage to John Byron in the year 1785. With her Scottish ancestry for omens and superstition perhaps Catherine’s confusion is understandable for she did indeed marry ‘Mad Jack’ Byron on Friday May 13 and by all accounts their brief marriage was a disaster.

I Have Suffered! Can It EVER Be Known?

On April 21, Byron penned one of his last letters to his 'Dearest Augusta' as he made plans to leave his home and his life in England behind him. He had signed the deed of separation on the afternoon of Sunday April 21 1816 signifying the end of his brief year-long marriage to Annabella and from the fatherhood of his five-month old daughter Ada. He left 13 Piccadilly Terrace on April 23, St George's Day, bound for Dover and finally departed from England on Thursday April 25 and was never to see Augusta, Annabella or Ada again...

I Once More Remind You I Am YOUR Child!

I received a most kind and affectionate letter from Lady Byron, and money, with offers of protection for myself and my child, and the power of quitting a neighbourhood which was most painful to me. This was in August 1840. I willingly and joyfully accepted these offers.... Lady Byron, proposed that I should accompany her …

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A ‘Dashing’ Tour of Newstead Abbey!

Since discovering the hidden treasure that is Newstead Abbey I remain enraptured by the Gothic ruin which as the ancestral home of Lord Byron influenced much of his wonderful poetry and I always eagerly anticipate any visit. Excited by the promise of an 'improved visitor experience' and on a cold and pleasant day in April I was taken to Newstead Abbey for a Mother's Day treat and with our place on the new guided tour booked for 2pm, we headed over to the 'Cafe in the Abbey' for lunch...

Lady Melbourne Braves Opinion!

"Lady Melbourne the best and kindest female I ever knew" ~ Lord Byron. Educated, attractive and with a talent for ambition Elizabeth Milbanke would soon move away from provincial Yorkshire and by 1769 had married Peniston Lamb, a wealthy, foolish and easy going lawyer and as she worked hard to advance the fortune and the prestige of her family, she would become became one of the most celebrated Society Hostesses on behalf of the Whig Party...